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“The Days of Old” PDF Print E-mail
Tuesday, December 8, 2009
Psalmist David wrote, “I remember the days of old…”(Psalm 143:5) The context of the presiding verse indicates that David, instead of worrying over the present with its troubles and burdens, looked backward with it’s truths.

Psalmist David wrote, “I remember the days of old…”(Psalm 143:5) The context of the presiding verse indicates that David, instead of worrying over the present with its troubles and burdens, looked backward with it’s truths. Do you remember the days of old? I do. There are many things about the days of old that I wouldn’t want to repeat. Compared to today’s world, many of them were difficult.

As a boy, my bathroom was a wash pan, a ragged washcloth and a cake of homemade soap. My Charmin was a Sears and Roebuck Catalog and I was not alone by a long shot. My restroom was a four by four plank building, which was completely air conditioned. We had pinto beans, potatoes and cornbread for lunch, and at supper the menu was varied with potatoes, pinto beans and cornbread—the leftovers. In the days of old, one ate “such as was before him” or else he starved. But by high school time indoor plumbing and a better lifestyle became the order of the day, and things were much better.

However, the days of old had many great truths, and David was pondering them. Maybe our society needs to do the same. The days of old were characterized by hard work and thrift, whereas today shirking on the job and easy credit seem to be the order of the day. This nation is in debt up to the collars of its Chinese shirts. Just wait until Americans are forced to adopt a global currency, then if one is lucky he’ll receive fifty cents on the dollar for his money.

The days of old were also characterized by tough love, whereas today parents take up for their children and punish the teachers.

The days of old had two parents living with their children, whereas today there may be one parent and a live-in who abuses the children and even several molest them.

The days of old had preachers who preached from the Bible, worked daily with the spiritually sick and the physically sick, whereas today they sit in their comfortable offices waiting for someone to come and their evenings engaging in gimmickry in the form of entertainment.

Perhaps we could profit from looking at the truths in “the days of old.” Preachers, this would be a good sermon topic for Sunday. Just a suggestion.