Uneven Playing Field

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One would have to have his head in the sand not to take note of how much the news media slants stories. If you are pro-abortion, you are called pro-choice. If you are pro-life, and I am, you are called anti-abortion. Then the unborn baby is called a fetus. Abortion is called a medical procedure. As far as the truth is concerned, the news media is worthless. The news media is liberal, and stops just short of lying in reporting the news. Slanting the news is their game.

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Spring Garden

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April is the month of planting the spring garden. Onions go in first, and then potatoes. These are the two crops that the king’s deer don’t eat, so we don’t have to plant them inside the deer fence. All other vegetables and fruits can be destroyed if unprotected.

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I Protest

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I protest! This country was built upon the freedom to protest. I’m not thinking of riots, but of honest protesting because over Nation’s stability s at risk. When protesting is outlawed, then our liberties and freedoms will be gone. When there gone, they will never be regained. Freedom of speech grants me the right to peacefully express my views. Those who threaten protesters by insisting that they will agiate the loose cannons among us to violence are simply trying to stop the protest movement that is currently sweeping America. They are protestors as well- attempting to silence all who are against Big Government.

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“Composted” Chicken Litter

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“Composted” chicken litter is not compost or a fertilizer. It is a toxic waste product from a horrible industrial process known as commercial chicken houses. The small and poisons create ill feelings with neighbors and it pollutes the land and water, besides the air. The only place it should be spread is on the heads of those who profit from the broiler industry, but they live in other countries.

We’ve been making compost for the 2011 crop. The ground is still a little cold for planting most vegetables, so we are holding back. There will be plenty of time for gardening.

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The Truth In Love… Take It or Leave It.

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The wise King Solomon wrote, “Buy the truth and sell it not…Proverbs 23:23), but most seem more interested in selling the truth than buying it. Our times desperately need the truth, but they need it in love.

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Potatoes

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The potatoes are tucked into the soft ground up on the Purcell Hill. We use potatoes to build better soil. This year we planted 1700 pounds of seed potatoes.

The fields were well composted and turned last fall. The land was hard packed, it hadn’t been plowed in a generation or more. A typical ridge, the clay was yellow and the top soil thin; allowing plenty of room for improvement.

Early in the spring we rebroke it with the chisel plow, and I decided it needed more compost. Easter weekend found me spreading another 33 loads and plowing it in, finishing up by headlights.

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Wanted!

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Wanted: caring people who view fellow humans as having worth, as having been made in the image of God. The sick, the young, the elderly, the handicapped, the dying are too often viewed as a nuisance in our selfish and uncaring society.

Recently a lady by the name of Ellen Delaney-Ball, a native of West Virginia, but living in Nashville, passed away at the Palace in Red Boiling Springs. Her body was carried to the Anderson & Son Funeral Home in RBS, but no relative even claimed it. After a few days, she was laid to rest at the Whitley Cemetery in Red Boiling Springs. Macon Bank & Trust, Citizens Bank and Lafayette Broadcasting cared enough, that each sent a wreath of flowers. Not a single relative came to cry and say goodbye. She died without family and she was buried without family. Sadly enough, this is repeated daily in our country. The uncaring are legion. Wanted: those who will care.

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Blueberries

Version:1.0 StartHTML:0000000181 EndHTML:0000005355 StartFragment:0000002364 EndFragment:0000005319 SourceURL:file://localhost/Users/computer/Desktop/obits/barefootfarmer.doc Blueberries grow well in Tennessee. There is a big patch of Hwy 231 before the bridge over the Cumberland River, and one across from the winery in Macon County. We have a small patch for our own use, but just planted another row on the farm.                                                                                                                     

A friend in Summertown invited me over to dig some plugs from an old patch near where he lives. New shoots were coming up everywhere, and in a few hours we had about 50 of them in pots. A few dozen came up bare root with long roots on them, and I am trying to make root cuttings for plants later on.    Agriculture is free. I want to learn how to propagate fruits and berries so folks donít have to pay exhorborant prices to get an orchard started. The apple and pear trees I graft cost me less than a dollar each, but it often costs $10 or $20 for a fruit tree. Iím going to figure out how to start blueberry plants, too.                                                                                                                                                                                  

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Valerian

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I plated a valerian patch yesterday. It felt good to get my hands dirty, cleaning out the chickweed and dead nettle that sprouts up in late winter. I shook the soil off of their thick root systems and loosened the bed deeply with the digging fork.

Sand and compost were then incorporated into the bed. they clay soils we have benefit with the addition of sand, it helps keep them open. Compost goes on everything around here.

A clump of valerian were gently wiggled, and yielded then individual plants. I tucked them into the flower garden about 18” apart. A little water finished the transition to their new home.

 

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Onions

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When spring fever hits, onions are the first thing on my mind. They can withstand temperatures down to 20°, and need to get well established before warmer weather sets in. we eat onions often, and assume our customers do, too.

Onion varieties are classified according to the length of the day light required for them to bulb. Summer days are longer up North than they are in the South. Northern, or long day varieties, won’t bulb up as well in the south, so we grow short day varieties. There are also intermediate ones, which do well here, too.

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Mr. Gordon, We aren’t Bugs Bunny

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Poor old Bugs Bunny, his enemies were forever dangling carrots before him in an effort to trap him. This is what the progressives in D.C. are doing to us. Only they caught Bart Gordon instead.

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Gardener's Dream

Version:1.0 StartHTML:0000000183 EndHTML:0000003368 StartFragment:0000002365 EndFragment:0000003332 SourceURL:file://localhost/Users/computer/Desktop/obits/barefoot%20famer.doc The International Harvester Farmall 140 tractor is a gardener’s dream come true. It can’t be beat for single row truck farming. I use a bigger tractor for primary tillage, and then the Farmall lays off the rows and keeps the middles loose and weed-free. I grew up with a cub, which is an older, smaller, Farmall. My dad didn’t swear much, so I remember distinctly pull-starting or fixing the cub, which routinely wouldn’t crank up when he needed it the most. We jumped off it as it rolled over once when I was three, and at 10 I had my own run in with a tree. Ah, the joys of farm life. Charles let me borrow his 140 many years ago, and I fell in love. I’d been using a Ford 600 for cultivating, which meant I had to look behind me to see what was going on. On the Farmall you look straight in front of you, allowing much more precision.
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I Told You So…

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It is difficult to believe and hard to swallow, but it is true-the politicians in Washington are seriously considering stopping payments for therapy from Medicare. This is another way of saying, “Let the senior citizens die, they’ve outlived their usefulness.”

Let me share with my readers a true story. Nadine Short, a paralyzed senior citizen, who has for years cared for herself, though confined to a wheelchair, recently admitted herself to the Palace Care and Rehab Center in Red Boiling Springs. Nadine lives near Tompkinsville, Ky. One arm was partially paralyzed from a stroke, but after several weeks of therapy at the Palace, she was able to return to her home, where she is caring for herself from a wheelchair and is costing Medicare not one red cent. Without the therapy, she would have been confined to the nursing home. So which is less expensive-therapy, and return home, or a long stay in the nursing home?

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Thomas Jefferson

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Thomas Jefferson loved gardening. I got a copy of his Garden Book 20 years ago, which details the work at the 2 acre garden plantings and 8 acre orchard at Monticello. Know that democracy could only survive in a nation of small farms and small businesses. Last week I finally visited Monticello.

Hugh Lovel, an agricultural consultant from Australia, accompanied me, so the ride was full of farm talk. I gave a daylong gardening workshop, did a bit of consulting and lecturing the next day. Then we climbed the little mountain and admired the beautiful grounds of Jefferson Home.

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The Brick

Anonymous

A young and successful executive was traveling down a neighborhood street, going a bit too fast in his new Jaguar. He was watching for kids darting out from between parked cars and slowed down when he thought he saw something.

As his car passed, no children appeared. Instead, a brick smashed into the Jag’s side door! He slammed on the breaks and backed the Jag back to the spot where the brick had been thrown.

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Learning About Organic Agriculture

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I am often asked to recommend books for learning about organic agriculture. I appreciate the many good books put out by Rodale Press, Acres, USA and others over the last few decades, they are not my favorites. Farming is not about double-digging, plastic hoop houses and amendments to buy, it’s about soil. The best books on agriculture that I have found are grade school textbooks written a hundred years ago.

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How Corruption and Immorality Become Rooted In A Community

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Corruption and immorality are twins whose destructive power has spread like wildfire in recent years thoughout America’s towns and communities. In an effort explains the havoc caused by these twin demons, men have laid the blame at the feet of town and community leadership. The truth is, bad leadership is the result of poor choices by voters. As long as the citizens of the community choose their leaders based upon social, religious, and clique ties, just that long will our towns and communities suffer at the hands of ignorant and greedy leaders. Poor leaders are the result of unwise voting. The citizens of a community are to blame for the corruption and immorality in their community when they cast their vote for one who lacks character and is destitute of leadership traits.

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A Definition of Intelligence

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A definition of intelligence is the ability to respond successfully to a new situation. This type of intelligence resides in a humus-rich soil which is permeated with beneficial micro organisms. The new situation would be a new crop, and a response is the colonization of the new roots with the specific microbes that create maximum production and crop health.

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THE DOWNTRODDEN PRODUCE UNDERDOG CHILDREN

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Normally we think of the downtrodden as individuals who are forced by those in power to live in poverty. Many children today have been born into downtrodden families. If their parents are downtrodden, then can they expect to rise above the economics, educational and social levels of their family? Some do and some don’t. What usually happens is that the children of a downtrodden family become underdogs. Guess what? Society expects them to lose.

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Community Supported Farm

In the fall of 1999, my friend Dan asked me why I didn’t use the community supported agriculture model to distribute our produce, I explained that we tried in the late 1980’s, but the folks didn’t want to drive out to the farm. His immediate response was “I’ll drive it to them,” and our present CSA was born.

I charged $25.00 per week for a share. Our shares were too many vegetables for many people, so eventually we sold half shares for $15.00 per week. We have grown together for 10 years now and have not raised our prices. As our costs rise, we just got more members and grew more acres.

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