Look What’s Happening in Public Schools

The Muslins aren’t coming.  No, they are already here.  They have weaseled their way into charter schools in America at the expense of U.S. taxpayers.  Many of the charter schools throughout this country are being run by a secretive and powerful sect from Turkey called the Gulen Movement, so named after and headed by a Turkish preacher named Fethullan Gulen who has founded other schools in 100 countries.  The Gulen Movement opened the first U.S. charter school in America in 1999.  Gulen’s schools spread rapidly, when Gulen figured out how to work our system and get U.S. taxpayers to pay for his religious and social movement.  This movement now operates the largest number of charter schools in this country.  In my research I’ve learned this movement has 135 schools, teaching more than 45,000 students in 26 states.  Guess who is paying for this?  You are-the American taxpayer.  These schools have Turkish board members and Turkish teachers who are referred to as “international teachers.”  After the school day is over, before the buses are allowed to leave, the students are taught Islam.  This is brain-washing America’s children, financed by local governments and federal grants.  Charter schools hire and fire their teachers and thus avoid control by educational departments.

            Our dumb politicians are assisting the Muslims in taking over America and slowly turning it into an Islamic state.  Thirty-six Turkish charter schools in Texas have received $100 Million in government funds and 16 percent of the workers are Turkish.

            Don’t let this administration in D.C. steal our heritage.  The propaganda being spread to America’s youth distorts its Founding Fathers, moral values, free market system, and Christianity.  If we continue to ignore this threat, then our children and grandchildren may very well live in an Islamic state.

            Can we afford four more years of mismanagement of the U.S. Government and support of radical Islam?

            I have the constitutional right to believe and say the above.

            God bless America.           

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Spring Brings Beautiful Things

Spring brings beautiful things, flowers and bees and a bird that sings. Gardeners are busier than bees, blooming in their exuberance and humming right along with mother nature’s display. We’ve added necessary minerals, gently tilled the soil, and livened things up with plenty of compost and biodynamic preparations. Let’s go!

If the ground is damp enough to make a ball in your fist that doesn’t shatter when you drop it, we stay out of the field. Compost piles are made for next year. Dandelions need to be picked for preparation. Horns are filled with ground quartz and buried. Tomato cages get made, chickweed is pulled from around the berries, seeds are inventoried and garden plans jotted down.

On April 1, I got the cold frames ready to grow the tomato, pepper and eggplants for transplanting later. Sifted compost, sand and soil makes up the top few inches, ontop of the same mixture (unsifted) to a depth of eight inches or so. A little phosphate, lime and kelp are mixed in, too. I make rows with a stick, three inches apart, and carefully drop seeds an inch apart in the rows. After firming them in with the side of my hand, I rake with my fingers to cover them up.

As soon as the ground is dry enough, onions and leeks go in. Plants are sorted, and the small ones are healed in temporarily to get bigger. The plants are set six inches apart, and two can be planted together. Onion sets, for green onions, are sown and covered up, but in a different garden, to avoid disease.

Potatoes are cut up so each piece is the size of an egg and has a couple of eyes on it. notice the stem end and don’t confuse it for an eye. They are dropped a foot apart in the furrow with the eye up, and then stepped on before being covered.

After two weeks, a harrow is pulled over the rows to disturb sprouting weeds. This does not bother the potatoes sprouting below where the harrow reaches. A tine harrow or rotary how actually goes over young plants without doing too much damage and greatly reduces weed pressure.

A narrow furrow is made for lettuce, parsley and swiss chard. The lettuce will be dug up and transplanted into beds, at a foot apart, in about six weeks, leaving that row for planting a summer crop.  The chard, parsley, and celery go next to each other because they will stay there all year, even over the winter if protected.

For carrots, beets and radish, we make a wide-bottomed furrow and thinly sprinkle the seed. It is easy to get them too thick. I roll the seed through my fingers and watch as it falls, but not at the ground. I want a few inches between the plants. All seeds are pushed in with the back of a rake, stepped on, or rolled over with a wheelbarrow to firm them in. then they are covered with dry soil by raking.

A few warm days around April fool’s day don’t fool me. Every row of the spring crops will get the soil raked away as soon as the sprouts appear. Then they’ll be hoed and cultivated before any weeds are visible. I have x ray vision and can see weeds sprouting underground. It is so much easier to weed them before they appear to ordinary vision.

We tend what we’ve planted before planting more. Warm weather crops like warm weather, so I don’t push my luck. I sacrifice the honor of having the first bean or tomato, and don’t take chances on a late frost nipping tender plants. Enjoy the flowers, and the birds and the bees, and spend spring with the spring crops. In May, when the ground has thoroughly warmed up, you’ll be glad the spring things are well taken care of.

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Lectures

I frequently give lectures as part of my business. It can be to youngsters at Head Start, to an elderly garden club, or to anything in between. I’ve slowly gotten over stage fright and give speeches fairly easily. Although our county executive said my talk to the commissioners fourteen months ago was respectful, he refuses to let me address them again. “We are not talking about chicken anymore, “ he said. People talk to me about chickens all the time.

On March 2nd I gave two lectures in Bowling Green, at the Organic Association of Kentucky’s annual conference. It’s a good bunch of people trying to get more organics going in our neighboring state.

The next day I attended the Nashville Lawn and Garden Show. Many old and new friends meet me there every year for my lecture. It turns into a fun question and answer session. The Davidson County Master Gardeners were represented, and have asked me to speak at their May 19th get together, at the Ellington Agriculture Center.

March 10th found me back in Nashville at Lipscomb University, giving a 3 ½ hour class on gardening. Afterwards, I gave a talk on beekeeping to a different group of people.

The Tennessee Organic Growers Association also hired me to lecture at their annual conference on March 24th. They are a hard working group active in the organic movement in Tennessee, and also had speakers from Pennsylvania and Washington State.

Two local groups, Kirbytown Farm Community and Friends of Long Hungry, still meet regularly to share research on the impact of Confined Animal Feeding Operations (CAFO’s) coming into Macon County. We believe our findings would be of interest to our local representatives and policy makers.

Whenever a major industry moves into a rural county, people talk about it. Many of our friends and family have been negatively impacted by the chicken houses next door in Clay County, from what we can tell, the citizens of Macon County are uneasy with the prospect of CAFO communities, and can see the truth in this statement.  But it is never too late to admit a mistake and change direction.

Yesterday, Nashville Public Television came here and filmed three more T.V. shows. I would like to continue operating my business at my home, but feel threatened by the huge Tyson (who owns Cobb) chicken houses being erected 450 feet from my kitchen doorstep.

With 300 acres, there is plenty of room to move them back to 1500 feet away from my 1871 log cabin, the public organic garden and the storage cave. Cobb’s own restrictions are “1500 feet from a public area or business.” The Macon County Commissioners unanimously passed a resolution stating CAFO’s must be 1500 feet from a residence. Why are they so close to me?

Hundreds of people visit here every year, and spend money locally. The concern throughout Middle Tennessee, wherever I go, is deeply gratifying. Most importantly, the wide support I have in my local community touches my heart. I didn’t know so many cared so much. As I keep on the lecture circuit and meet all kinds of people, I always can’t wait to get home to my comfortable little neighborhood.

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Variety id the Spice of Life

Variety is the spice of life, and gardeners love to try new things. Here is a list of the vegetable varieties we will be growing this year, most of which I have grown before: Arugula- standard; Bush beans- Blue Lake, Roma II, Cherokee Yellow Wax; Climbing beans- Purple Flat, Kentucky Wonder; Ghelly beans- Dwarf Horticulture, Black Turtle, Soy Butterbean; Beets- Detroit Dark Red, Chioggia; Cabbage (Chinese)- Blues, Rubicon, Michihili, Joi choy, Mei Qing, Bokchoy; Carrots- Danvers Half Long; Celery- Utah; Collards- Georgia Southern; Corn- G-90, Incredible, Silver Queen, Golden Bantam, Country Gentleman; Cucumber- Marketmore 76, Straight Eight, National Pickling; Eggplant- Black Beauty, Orient Express; Garlic- Spanish Roja, Music; Gourds- Dipper, Bird House, Crown of Thorns, Small Warted, Autumn Wings; Kale- Flatleaf, Siberian, Blue Scotch Curled; Leeks- King Richard; Lettuce- Nevada, Magenta, Concept, Red Sails, Tropicana, Buttercrunch, Jericho, Winter Density, Anvenue; Melon- Honey Rock, Green Nutmeg; Mustard- Southern Giant Curled, Mizuna; Okra- Burgundy, Clemson Spineless; Onions- Copra, Walla Walla, Yellow Ebenezer; Parsley- Italian Flatleaf, Forest Green, Survivor; Parsnip- Hollow Crown; Peanuts- Virginia Jumbo; Peas- Sugar Snap, Oregon Giant, Skunkpeas; Peppers- Carmen, Pizza, Olympus, Gypsy, Golden Treasure, Hungarian Wax, Jalapeno, Cayenne; Potatoes- Kennebec, Red Pontiac, Yukon Gold; Pumpkin- Old-Time Tennessee, Cushaw; Radish- Cherry Belle, French Breakfast, Daikon, Watermelon, China Rose; Rutabega- Purple-top; Spinach- Bloomsdale Long Standing; Summer Squash- Early Prolific Straightneck, Yellow Scallop, Sunburst, Gold Rush Zucchini, Trombocini; Winter Squash- Waltham Butternut, Table Queen Acorn, Carnival, Delicatta, Sweet Dumpling, Small Wonder Spaghetti; Sweet Potato- Golden Nugget; Swiss Chard- French Swiss Chard; Tomatoes (hybrids)- Better Boy, Celebrity, Goliath, Big Beef, Pink Beauty, Pink Girl, Fantastic; Tomatoes (open-pollinated)- Delicious, Mortgage Lifter, Bradley, Indigo Rose, Black Trifele, Golden Jubilee; Turnips- Purpletop, Amber Globe, Gold Ball, Scarlet Queen, Hakurei; Watermelon- Jubilee, Charleston Grey, Crimson Sweet, Tendersweet, Sugar Baby, Amish Moon and Stars; Herbs- Large Leaf Basil, Pukat Pill, Sage, Oregano, English Thyme, Sorrel; Flowers- Brite Lites Cosmos, Giant Dahlia mix Zinnia, Giant Sunflower, Tithonia, Rosa Rugosa, Valerian, Tuberose.

Warm weather excites gardeners, but do not forget we often have frosts in late April or early May. April 1st is a good time to start tomatoes, peppers, and eggplants in a cold frame. Outside, we can plant onions, potatoes, beets, carrots, lettuce, parsley, peas, Swiss chard, celery, spinach, leeks, and radish. We will wait until May for everything else, and will not plant turnips, Arugula, cabbage, mustard, collards, Rutabega, and kale until mid-August.

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RBS in Retrospect

  Beginning in the late nineteenth century, people, with reasons varying from curiosity to seeking the healing of illnesses, found their way to the valley of “magical springs,” made famous by the founder of Red Boiling Springs, Shepherd Kirby. Soon, the news of the healing powers of the sulfur springs spread far and wide. This resulted in large numbers of people coming to RBS, seeking a remedy for any number of illnesses.

Very few people living in today’s RBS have much knowledge of this little hamlet’s history. I grew up in the mid-forties and early fifties.  As a lad, I was one of the pin-setters at the Palace Bowling Lanes, which consisted of eight alleys. The Smith Chapel Boys, Bobby Joines, Earnest & Doyle Smith, and Billy & Joe Layne Whitley, myself, and others, worked as pin-setters for Clarence McClure and Harold Driver, who were the managers of Palace Lanes.  I earned as much as three dollars on the weekend, beginning Friday night and ending Sunday night, staying open until midnight on Saturdays.  There were not any unions, and each of us was poor and glad to earn a few pennies per week. There were bowling alleys on North Springs Road, near the Arlington Hotel, and at the Cloyd Hotel, known today as the Thomas House, too. In addition to these, there was another at Simmon’s Lake, which was in the lower part of East RBS, along Salt Lick Creek. Bowling was a favorite sport of most tourists. The more lively ones, however, preferred drinking and dancing at one of the two dance halls.

While the Smith Chapel Boys were setting pins, Doyle Gaines was going up and down the sidewalks and porches of the hotels with his now-famous shoe shine box, making a “killing.”  Another well-known boy, Bobby Knight, was popping popcorn at the York Show House.

The crowds were unbelievable, especially on Saturday nights. The Palace Park was always filled with both visitors and local people. Next to the Palace Park was a shooting gallery, operated by King Milles, which attracted large crowds. Across the creek from the Palace Park was a café, owned by the McLerros family, who also owned both the Palace and Colonial Hotels. The café was managed by my parents from April through Labor Day. It stayed open all night on Fridays and Saturdays. An annual summer circus and carnival attracted even more visitors.

There was a time, before the days of which I’ve been writing, when the crowds were so large that visitors to RBS would go out in the county and stay at farm houses.

But time has a way of changing things and communities are no exception. There was a time, in the early twentieth century, believe it or not, when Red Boiling Springs was more popular than Gatlinburg. However as older generations were replaced by younger ones who had little love for the town’s heritage, the handwriting on the wall became clear to those who dared to read it.

More recently, a group of elected officials closed down the sulpher wells and in so doing erased much of the history of our town. Only a handful of elected officials have supported the three hotels which are being operated by three great families. The only thing that could have kept RBS alive, and it is best suited for this very thing, is the concept of a small and desirable place to escape the turmoil of large cities. Perhaps one day, with the support of the entire community, the City of Red Boiling Springs will rise again. Otherwise all that it is, and all that it once was, is in jeopardy.

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Everything in Nature is Related

Recent discoveries in quantum physics, microbiology, and ecology verify something gardeners have long known.  Everything in nature is related.  There are no solid lines between the plants’ roots, the soil, and the bacteria and fungi tying it all together.  To help understand why garden crops do or do not thrive, we are led into the enigmatic field of companion planting.

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Mr. President, Buy Your Energy Secretary A Duck

The story is told of an elderly lady who was in the market for a watch dog. Eventually she purchased what was described as an excellent guard dog. To her dismay the dog had a hard time staying awake. Instead of barking and scaring off varmints and thieves, this highly recommended guard dog would sleep. She told her story to a friend, who quickly solved her problem. “I’ll tell you what,” she said, “I’ve got a duck who is a buddy to my watch dog, and everytime my guard dog tries to go to sleep, the duck pecks him on the nose and quacks.” So she continued, “Come over to my house and get my duck and  he’ll break your dog of his sleepy habits.” She did, and her friend was right. Peck, quack, peck, quack. Soon the dog was weaned from his sleepy habits.

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Silent Spring

Silent Spring, by Rachel Carson, opened the eyes of the world to the dangers of chemical sprays.  The book came out fifty years ago, in 1962, when chlordane, DDT, and Aldrin were commonly used.  Case studies of the widespread poisoning of humans and wildlife reported in her essays led to the ban of these chlorin-ated hydrocarbons.  The ban is actually only on domestic use; chemical companies in the U.S. still produce DDT for use in other countries.

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The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly

Paul Warned Timothy that the world would wax worse and worse (2 Timothy 3:13). His prophecy is certainly being fulfilled in today’s time. However, there is still some good, and for it we are thankful. We see the good, the bad and the ugly in today’s America.

There is usually a mixture of the good, the bad, and the ugly in most situations that develop from time to time. I take off my hat to Councilman Tom Fultz for his courage and honesty in revealing the overtime issue in Red Boiling Springs. He did his job, and for it the citizens of RBS are grateful. However, there are other hidden things that have not been brought to light. In my opinion, and others, this may be only the tip of the iceburg. From what I’m hearing there may be more to come. When power is abused, especially the waste of taxpayers dollars, this constitutes the bad.

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The Grace of God

Error in Last Week’s Article

     Last week’s article stated that 67% of Americans are Christians.  It

should have read that 67% of Americans believe in Christianity.  There is a

vast difference in being a Christian and believing in Christianity.  Contrary to

President Obama’s remarks concerning religion in America, belief in Christi-

anity is not fading.  Christianity, by the way, is the only true religion.  All

others are man-made.

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Barefoot Farmer II

We have a new book, Barefoot Farmer II. I say “we” because of all the work done by the designer and typesetter, Victoria, and the illustrator, Linda. “We” also includes Kathryne, Gabby, and the rest of the Macon County Chronicle staff, who turn my weekly chick scratches into a newspaper column. You readers are included too, as your interest keeps me writing.

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Potash

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Potash is an added bonus to heating your home with wood. As the name suggests, it contains potassium, wood ashes also have calcium and many trace elements that are needed in our mineral-deficient soils.

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The Sin of Silence

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Sometimes silence is wise. Job speaks of the wisdom of silence (Job 13:5). Solomon wrote that there is such a thing as too much talk (Eccles 5:3). We can sum it up by saying what Solomon wrote in Proverbs 10:14: “A wise man holds his tongue.”

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Little Taters

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I once read of this man who planted two sixty-foot rows of potatoes in his garden. When he dug them he got only eighteen potatoes. Eighteen little potatoes. He ate the whole crop for supper. He said he had an excellent crop of vines but few potatoes.

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Dismantling of America’s Heritage

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Little by little, the enemies of Democracy and Christianity are whittling away at America’s heritage. The ACLU, the Liberal politicians, and radical Muslims have embarked on a mission to eliminate the influence of Democracy and Christianity in America’s culture.

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Rutabaga

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Rutabaga is a plant grown for its fleshy root. Although they are quite similar to turnips, they are distinctive species. Brassica Rapa is the turnip, while rutabaga are Brassica Campestris or Brassica Napus.

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The Season for Fall Plowing

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Plowing is the archetypical farm work. Ground must  be loosened and plants turned under in order to grow a crop. The plow comes in many shapes and sizes for various uses we put it to.

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The Purpose of Polls

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“How far would Moses have gone if he had taken a poll in Egypt? What would Jesus Christ have preached if he had taken a poll in the land of Israel? What would have happened to the reformation if Martin Luther had taken a poll? It isn’t polls on public opinion of the moment that counts, it is right and wrong leadership.”- Harry S, Truman.

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Status quo vs. Competent Leadership

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Turnip Time

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It’s turnip time again. As fall waxes, and the garden wanes, turnips take over. We sow them in many of our fields for a cover crop, along with crimson clover and buckwheat. If you want some, come up to Long Hungry Road and stop in. they are right below the blueberry patch, near the tall bamboo.

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